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chuxor.org: My home arcade is better than Galaxy World!
Sanyo 14" (Nintendo) Tube Swap
I have this DK cocktail from a bulk buy. I open it up - lo and behold the neck on the 14" monitor is broken. The chassis looks fairly good so my project for today is swapping a tube.
Here is what we have to work with: one Sanyo 14" with some apparent guillotine action to the neck stem. I wasn't sure if I could find a replacement tube or not, but after a plea to RGVAC, James Cross replied and sent a replacement for the cost of shipping (!wow!) I would like to take this opportunity to thank James for his generosity. I will pay the favor forward.
First, since the neck was broken, not just cracked, I went looking for the cap. I looked in the bottom of the cabinet. I looked in the neckboard - and there it was! Here I am removing the broken cap and pins from the neckboard.
This is our replacement tube. Zero burn. We like!
Down to business. First I discharged any residual HV charge from the anode. I won't go into much detail on this, as it has been covered extensively by others. If you aren't comfortable or proficient at discharging a monitor, STOP and get someone who is for chrissakes. Nuff said. Still here? :) Allright! After discharging, you must remove the 2 metal brackets that make up the cage. They are fastened on with sheet metal screws - no prob.
The tube may be shot, but you may wish to save some of the usable components. Here I am cutting free the ties fastening the degaussing ring so that I can save it, just in case I should ever need an emergency spare degaussing ring for a 14" Sanyo monitor (my wife just threw something at me :) Allright, I admit I can't throw away working stuff - you however may opt to just junk the old degaussing ring since in all likelihood you will never need the thing, I'm saving mine though...
OK we're getting ready to remove the yoke, so go ahead and disconnect its RGB inputs from the board....
Carefully remove the convergence rings and the yoke by sliding them off the end of the tube. Why did I save these? If I happen across a 13" TV and want to throw it in a Nintendo cocktail game, I can swap this yoke onto it and make it work. (Use the original convergence rings though.) Originally, I thought James was sending me the tube only, and that part of this writeup would include swapping the yoke, but I suppose that will wait for another day.
I was going to just button this all back up - but WAIT - It would be a flippin crime not to install a cap kit while everything is all accessible, right? So why not fire up that iron and do a little maintenance? Also might as well replace all of those old fuses while your at it too. If you are really really thorough, check the HOT to see if it is operating nicely.
If you have as many Nintendos as I do, you should keep a few spare cap kits in your tool box.
On careful inspection, I noticed that the pins on the replacement tube were slightly bent. I carefully eased them back with my finger. Now is a good time to make sure the tube is clean, too. Although you should not clean off the dull grey coating on the back of the tube, that is the aquadag - you definitely need it, so keep that in mind when tidying up your tube. We are ready to install our new tube!
Re-fasten the brackets to the chassis base.
The easiest way I found was to carefully rest the tube, face down (on a soft cloth to prevent scratching) and then affix the chassis onto the backside. Gravity is on your side this way.
Now attach the brackets to the monitor frame. Once this is done, right the monitor on your bench and attach the base of the chassis to the base of the monitor frame. On the 13" model, you will also attach a small remote volume pot board to the front side of the monitor frame.
Attach the RGB inputs from the yoke to the chassis PCB. Install the neckboard. Install the anode cup. Reward yourself with a tasty beverage. I chose a Sam Adams "Octoberfest" right there. It was good :)

Well, that's about it so far - I have a 300 mA fuse that needs to be replaced before I give this puppy the juice. Stay tuned and I'll complete this photojournal with installation, tuning and hopefully, a picture of me playing DK on my cocktail.